Graphic Anti-Smoking Campaign by CDC to Launch Nationwide

If there is one good thing you can do for your lifelong health – it is quitting smoking. And now the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are backing that premise with a nationwide advertising campaign highlighting the horrific effects of smoking.

The initial campaigns and individual efforts by state governments to reduce smoking had a dramatic effect, but in recent years raising taxes on tobacco products has not maintained the once steady decline of smokers. The CDC is hoping to see that number continue to drop with ads featuring former smokers who have become victims of the gruesome health consequences of their habits.  Not to mention that the government has to find retaliation against the recent federal ruling that forcing tobacco companies to put anti-tobacco ads on their packaging is a violation of free speech.

The new campaign is designed for print, TV, radio and social media – many images and stories are graphic, but research has shown this type of advertising is very effective. The CDC estimates that this campaign will help approximately 50,000 smokers kick the habit.

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, claiming the lives of in excess of 440,000 Americans every year, while more than 8 million American are suffering from a smoking-related disease. These ads emphasize the immediate and horrendous damage that smoking can do to the body, featuring three former smokers, who tell their story in addition to offering advice on successfully quitting smoking.

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